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Research Papers

Application of the VPSC Model to the Description of the Stress–Strain Response and Texture Evolution in AZ31 Mg for Various Strain Paths

[+] Author and Article Information
Nitin Chandola

Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
REEF,
University of Florida,
1350 North Poquito Road,
Shalimar, FL 32579

Raja K. Mishra

General Motors Research and
Development Center,
30500 Mound Road,
Warren, MI 40890-9055

Oana Cazacu

Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
REEF,
University of Florida,
1350 North Poquito Road,
Shalimar, FL 32579
e-mail: cazacu@reef.ufl.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Materials Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received August 8, 2014; final manuscript received June 30, 2015; published online August 6, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Said Ahzi.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 137(4), 041007 (Aug 06, 2015) (10 pages) Paper No: MATS-14-1161; doi: 10.1115/1.4030999 History: Received August 08, 2014

Accurate description of the mechanical response of AZ31 Mg requires consideration of its strong anisotropy both at the single crystal and polycrystal levels, and its evolution with accumulated plastic deformation. In this paper, a self-consistent mean field crystal plasticity model, viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC), is used for modeling the room-temperature deformation of AZ31 Mg. A step-by-step procedure to calibrate the material parameters based on simple tensile and compressive mechanical test data is outlined. It is shown that the model predicts with great accuracy both the macroscopic stress–strain response and the evolving texture for these strain paths used for calibration. The stress–strain response and texture evolution for loading paths that were not used for calibration, including off-axis uniaxial loadings and simple shear, are also well described. In particular, VPSC model predicts that for uniaxial tension along the through-thickness direction, the stress–strain curve should have a sigmoidal shape.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Pole figures showing initial texture of AZ31 Mg sheet (a) reported by Khan et al. [6] and (b) measured from a large EBSD scan and used as input in the polycrystal model

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Fig. 2

Comparison between the measured texture and predicted texture: (a) uniaxial tension along RD at 13% strain (∼ failure); (b) uniaxial compression along RD at 8% strain; and (c) ND compression (no measured texture available)

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Fig. 3

Deformation response in RD tension: (a) stress–strain response and evolution of the microstructure according to calibrated VPSC model (line) in comparison with mechanical test data (symbol) and (b) relative activities of each deformation mode

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Fig. 4

Deformation response in RD compression: (a) stress–strain response and evolution of the microstructure according to calibrated VPSC model (line) in comparison with mechanical test data (symbol); (b) relative activities of each deformation mode; and (c) predicted twin volume fraction evolution

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Fig. 5

Deformation response in ND compression: (a) evolution of microstructure according to the calibrated VPSC (line) model and (b) relative activities of each deformation mode

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Fig. 6

Deformation response in TD tension: (a) stress–strain response and evolution of the microstructure according to the VPSC model (line) in comparison with mechanical test data (symbol) and (b) relative activities of each deformation mode

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Fig. 7

Deformation response in TD compression: (a) stress–strain response and evolution of the microstructure according to calibrated VPSC model (line) in comparison with mechanical test data (symbol), (b) relative activities of each deformation mode, and (c) predicted twin volume fraction evolution

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Fig. 8

Deformation response in DD tension: (a) stress–strain response and evolution of the microstructure according to the VPSC model (line) in comparison with mechanical test data (symbol) and (b) relative activities of each deformation mode

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Fig. 9

Deformation response in DD compression: (a) stress–strain response and evolution of the microstructure according to the VPSC model (line) in comparison with mechanical test data (symbol), (b) relative activities of each deformation mode, and (c) predicted twin volume fraction evolution

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Fig. 10

Deformation response in ND tension: (a) evolution of microstructure predicted by the VPSC model (line), (b) predicted relative activities of each deformation mode, and (c) predicted twin volume fraction evolution

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Fig. 11

Element subjected to a simple shear deformation γ in the plane (x–y), x being along RD and y along TD

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Fig. 12

Deformation response in RD shear: (a) stress–strain response and evolution of the microstructure according to the VPSC model (line) in comparison with mechanical test data (symbol), (b) relative activities of each deformation mode, and (c) predicted twin volume fraction evolution and experimentally observed value (x)

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Fig. 13

Pole figures in RD shear test at a von Mises equivalent strain γ/√3 = 20% (a) measured by Khan et al. [6] and (b) obtained with VPSC model

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