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Research Papers

Asymmetric Postbuckling Behavior of Hemispherical Shell Structure Under Axial Compression

[+] Author and Article Information
Shanshuai Wang

State Key Laboratory of Mechanical
System and Vibration,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China;
Shanghai Key Laboratory of Digital
Manufacture for Thin-Walled Structures,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: wssstella@sjtu.edu.cn

Shuhui Li

State Key Laboratory of Mechanical
System and Vibration,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China;
Shanghai Key Laboratory of Digital
Manufacture for Thin-Walled Structures,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: lishuhui@sjtu.edu.cn

Ji He

State Key Laboratory of Mechanical
System and Vibration,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China;
Shanghai Key Laboratory of Digital
Manufacture for Thin-Walled Structures,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: benbenhj@sjtu.edu.cn

Yixi Zhao

State Key Laboratory of Mechanical
System and Vibration,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China;
Shanghai Key Laboratory of Digital
Manufacture for Thin-Walled Structures,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: yxzhao@sjtu.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Materials Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received July 3, 2015; final manuscript received October 27, 2015; published online November 23, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Huiling Duan.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 138(1), 011005 (Nov 23, 2015) (9 pages) Paper No: MATS-15-1154; doi: 10.1115/1.4031960 History: Received July 03, 2015; Revised October 27, 2015

In real physical experiments, three typical deformation stages including elastic deformation stage, symmetric deformation stage, and asymmetric deformation stage appear step by step when the stainless steel hemispherical shell structure is under axial compression loading. During the asymmetric deformation stage, the rolling-plastic-hinge-radius which characterizes the size of the deformation area evolves along the circumferential direction with the compressive displacement. For the hemispherical shell structures with apparent asymmetric deformation stage, the double-buckling phenomenon of the structures in experiments can be clearly detected. The traditional theoretical analysis based on the assumption with circumferentially constant rolling-plastic-hinge-radius is not suitable to predict this phenomenon. For these hemispherical shell structures, load capacity and absorbed energy predicted by the traditional analysis are usually higher than experimental results in the asymmetric deformation stage. In this paper, a new description based on experimental observation for the evolution of rolling-plastic-hinge-radius has been proposed. Minimum energy principle was employed to obtain the postbuckling behavior. The energy evolution of different buckling stages during compression loading is investigated to evaluate the structure load capacity. Stainless steel hemispherical specimens with different sizes are tested under axial compression between two rigid plates to verify the theoretical modification. Good agreement is achieved between proposed model and experimental results. The theoretical model proposed in this paper can be used in prediction of postbuckling behavior for different deformation patterns in the asymmetric deformation stage. It also provides higher flexibility and efficiency for the postbuckling behavior prediction of hemispherical shell structures.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Illustration of the experimental situation

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Fig. 2

True stress–true strain relationship of 201 stainless steel

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Fig. 3

Deformation during the compression process (group R40)

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Fig. 4

Final deformation modes of different specimens

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Fig. 5

Relationship between compressive force and displacement of R50

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Fig. 6

Relationship between compressive force and displacement of different specimen groups

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Fig. 7

Measurement of the rolling-plastic-hinge-radius: (a) laser scanning three-dimensional measurement, (b) sections perpendicular to the polygon edge, and (c) fitting circle of the rolling-plastic-hinge area

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Fig. 8

Schematic diagram: (a) elastic deformation stage and (b) symmetric deformation stage

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Fig. 9

Schematic diagram of the polygon of asymmetric deformation stage

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Fig. 10

Schematic diagram of the asymmetric deformation stage: (a) top view and (b) section profile normal to the polygon edge

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Fig. 11

Comparison of experimental and analytical values for rolling-plastic-hinge-radius

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Fig. 12

Experimental and theoretical force–displacement data for three deformation modes: (a) specimen group R50 and (b) specimen group R70

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Fig. 13

Influence of dimension on critical compressive displacement: (a) first mode-jump point and (b) second mode-jump point

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Fig. 14

Energy–displacement curves for specimen groups (a) R50 and (b) R70

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