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Research Papers

A Novel Transparent Glass Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composite Interlayer for Blast-Resistant Windows

[+] Author and Article Information
Hua Zhu

Mechanical and Aerospace
Engineering Department,
University of Missouri,
Columbia, MO 65211

S. K. Khanna

Mechanical and Aerospace
Engineering Department,
University of Missouri,
Columbia, MO 65211
e-mail: khannas@missouri.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Materials Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received August 18, 2015; final manuscript received February 22, 2016; published online May 10, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Hareesh Tippur.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 138(3), 031007 (May 10, 2016) (11 pages) Paper No: MATS-15-1194; doi: 10.1115/1.4032882 History: Received August 18, 2015; Revised February 22, 2016

An optically transparent woven glass fiber-reinforced polyester composite has been fabricated. This composite has been used as an interlayer in the fabrication of a laminated glass-composite window panel for application in blast-resistant windows. The transparency of the glass fiber-reinforced composite was achieved by matching the refractive index of the polyester matrix with that of glass fibers. Various chemical additives have been investigated for their effectiveness in modifying the refractive index of the polyester matrix. The composite interlayer's mechanical properties under both quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions have been characterized in this study. The window panels were tested under various blast loading conditions. The panels perform well under U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) specified C, D, and E blast loading levels.

Copyright © 2016 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of main components of an SHPB system

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Fig. 2

Glass panel installation inside the BLS: (a) BLS and (b) glass panel inside BLS

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Fig. 3

Phase of light after passing through a glass fiber

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Fig. 4

Refractive index of polyester (cured product) with different DV concentrations (curing condition: curing temperature 20 °C, CE content 0.03 wt.%, and MEKP 1.2 wt.%)

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Fig. 5

Refractive index of polyester (cured product) with different PT concentrations (curing condition: curing temperature 20 °C, CE content 0.03 wt.%, and MEKP 1.2 wt.%)

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Fig. 6

Comparison between the experimentally measured light transmittance and theoretically predicted light transmittance

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Fig. 11

Level C test profiles: (a) pressure profile and (b) displacement profile

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Fig. 12

Level D test profiles: (a) pressure profile and (b) displacement profile

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Fig. 13

Laminated glass-composite panel of 7/16 in. thickness was cracked after the GSA level E blast test. Both the outer surfaces of the glass plies were smooth to touch and minor damage to the composite interlayer.

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Fig. 14

Level E blast loading resulted in severe damage to the glass-composite window panel of 3/8 in. thickness

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Fig. 15

A glass-composite panel of 5/8 in. thickness after level E blast loading

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Fig. 10

Surface micrographs of the glass fiber-reinforced composite at different strain rates: (a) 407 s−1, (b) 657 s−1, (c) 802 s−1, and (d) 960 s−1

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Fig. 9

Stress–strain curves of the glass fiber-reinforced composite at different strain rates

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Fig. 8

View of an outside scene, as seen through the window panel (left) and without the window panel (right), with camera placed 2 ft behind the panel

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Fig. 7

Light transmittance spectrum of the laminated glass-composite panel

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