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Research Papers

Incorporation of Dynamic Strain Aging Into a Viscoplastic Self-Consistent Model for Predicting the Negative Strain Rate Sensitivity of Hadfield Steel

[+] Author and Article Information
B. Bal, B. Gumus

Advanced Materials Group (AMG),
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Koç University,
Sarıyer, İstanbul 34450, Turkey

D. Canadinc

Advanced Materials Group (AMG),
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Koç University,
Sarıyer,
İstanbul 34450, Turkey
e-mail: dcanadinc@ku.edu.tr

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Materials Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received November 17, 2015; final manuscript received March 4, 2016; published online May 10, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Antonios Kontsos.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 138(3), 031012 (May 10, 2016) (8 pages) Paper No: MATS-15-1293; doi: 10.1115/1.4033072 History: Received November 17, 2015; Revised March 04, 2016

A new multiscale modeling approach is proposed to predict the contributions of dynamic strain aging (DSA) and the resulting negative strain rate sensitivity (NSRS) on the unusual strain-hardening response of Hadfield steel (HS). Mechanical response of HS was obtained from monotonic and strain rate jump experiments under uniaxial tensile loading within the 10−4 to 10−1 s−1 strain rate range. Specifically, a unique strain-hardening model was proposed that incorporates the atomic-level local instabilities imposed upon by the pinning of dislocations by diffusing carbon atoms to the classical Voce hardening. The novelty of the current approach is the computation of the shear stress contribution imposed on arrested dislocations leading to DSA at the atomic level, which is then implemented to the overall strain-hardening rule at the microscopic level. The new model not only successfully predicts the role of DSA and the resulting NSRS on the macroscopic deformation response of HS but also opens the venue for accurately predicting the deformation response of rate-sensitive metallic materials under any given loading condition.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 3

Cylindrical coordinate system utilized to describe the location of an interstitial C atom with respect to a positive-edge dislocation

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Fig. 2

Results of a representative strain rate jump test. The data were recompiled from Ref. [19].

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Fig. 1

The room temperature uniaxial tensile deformation response of HS obtained at different strain rates. The data were recompiled from Ref. [19].

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Fig. 5

Comparison of experimental and VPSC simulation results of the uniaxial tensile deformation response of HS at a strain rate of 1 × 10−2 s−1

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Fig. 6

Comparison of experimental and VPSC simulation results of the uniaxial tensile deformation response of HS at a strain rate of 1 × 10−3 s−1

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Fig. 7

Comparison of experimental and VPSC simulation results of the uniaxial tensile deformation response of HS at a strain rate of 1 × 10−4 s−1

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Fig. 8

Comparison of experimental and modified VPSC simulation results of the uniaxial tensile deformation response of HS at a strain rate of 1 × 10−1 s−1. Both a specific stress–strain range and the corresponding baseline analysis result are provided in the insets. The horizontal and vertical axes of the graphs presented in the insets correspond to “true stress (MPa)” and “true inelastic strain,” respectively.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Comparison of experimental and VPSC simulation results of the uniaxial tensile deformation response of HS at a strain rate of 1 × 10−1 s−1

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Comparison of experimental and modified VPSC simulation results of the uniaxial tensile deformation response of HS at a strain rate of 1 × 10−2 s−1. Both a specific stress–strain range and the corresponding baseline analysis result are provided in the insets. The horizontal and vertical axes of the graphs presented in the insets correspond to true stress (MPa) and true inelastic strain, respectively.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Comparison of experimental and modified VPSC simulation results of the uniaxial tensile deformation response of HS at a strain rate of 1 × 10−3 s−1. Both a specific stress–strain range and the corresponding baseline analysis result are provided in the insets. The horizontal and vertical axes of the graphs presented in the insets correspond to true stress (MPa) and true inelastic strain, respectively.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Comparison of experimental and modified VPSC simulation results of the uniaxial tensile deformation response of HS at a strain rate of 1 × 10−4 s−1. Both a specific stress–strain range and the corresponding baseline analysis result are provided in the insets. The horizontal and vertical axes of the graphs presented in the insets correspond to true stress (MPa) and true inelastic strain, respectively.

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