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Research Papers

Development of Noninteraction Material Models With Cyclic Hardening

[+] Author and Article Information
Thomas Bouchenot

Department of Mechanical
and Aerospace Engineering,
University of Central Florida,
Orlando, FL 32816
e-mail: Thomas.Bouchenot@knights.ucf.edu

Bassem Felemban

Department of Mechanical
and Aerospace Engineering,
University of Central Florida,
Orlando, FL 32816
e-mail: Engg.Bassem@gmail.com

Cristian Mejia

Department of Mechanical
and Aerospace Engineering,
University of Central Florida,
Orlando, FL 32816
e-mail: Mejia.Cristian72@knights.ucf.edu

Ali P. Gordon

Associate Professor
Mem. ASME
Department of Mechanical
and Aerospace Engineering,
University of Central Florida,
Orlando, FL 32816
e-mail: Ali.Gordon@ucf.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Materials Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received January 12, 2016; final manuscript received April 15, 2016; published online June 15, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Huiling Duan.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 138(4), 041007 (Jun 15, 2016) (15 pages) Paper No: MATS-16-1012; doi: 10.1115/1.4033488 History: Received January 12, 2016; Revised April 15, 2016

Simulation plays a critical role in the development and evaluation of critical components that are regularly subjected to mechanical loads at elevated temperatures. The cost, applicability, and accuracy of either numerical or analytical simulations are largely dependent on the material model chosen for the application. A noninteraction (NI) model derived from individual elastic, plastic, and creep components is developed in this study. The candidate material under examination for this application is 2.25Cr–1Mo, a low-alloy ferritic steel commonly used in chemical processing, nuclear reactors, pressure vessels, and power generation. Data acquired from prior research over a range of temperatures up to 650 °C are used to calibrate the creep and plastic components described using constitutive models generally native to general-purpose fea. Traditional methods invoked to generate constitutive modeling coefficients employ numerical fittings of hysteresis data, which result in values that are neither repeatable nor display reasonable temperature dependence. By extrapolating simplifications commonly used for reduced-order model approximations, an extension utilizing only the cyclic Ramberg–Osgood (RO) coefficients has been developed. This method is used to identify the nonlinear kinematic hardening (NLKH) constants needed at each temperature. Single-element simulations are conducted to verify the accuracy of the approach. Results are compared with isothermal and nonisothermal literature data.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Cyclic RO models superimposed with MLIH points at 300 °C and 500 °C

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Fig. 2

Plot of the (a) Young's modulus, elongation and (b) yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and cyclic yield strength with respect to temperature for 2.25Cr–1Mo. Values obtained from literature sources [18,19].

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Fig. 3

Cyclic RO models at various temperatures superimposed with published data

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Fig. 4

Sketch of a hysteresis loop with sample segments along the top left shoulder

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Fig. 5

Sketch of the fitting and segment bounds on a cyclic RO curve using the proposed determination method

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Fig. 6

Temperature dependence of NLKH parameters for midlife

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Fig. 7

Sample simulated elastic–plastic NLKH hysteresis loops for various completely reversed strain ranges between 0.4% and 3% at 500 °C

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Fig. 8

Sample simulated elastic–plastic NLKH hysteresis loops for various temperatures and a completely reversed strain range of 1.4%

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Fig. 9

SSC Model with published data from NIMS [22] and Parker [19]

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Fig. 10

Single-step loading using the midlife NLKH constants at 600 °C with a variety of strain rates

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Fig. 11

Simulated NLKH + SSC and MLIH + SSC hysteresis loops compared with experimental results for isothermal conditions at (a),(b) 20 °C and (c),(d) 500 °C

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Fig. 12

Comparison of stress amplitude from literature data [18,20] and simulated data using the (a) MLIH + SSC and (b) NLKH + SSC model. Upper and lower reference lines of ± 50 MPa are also plotted.

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Fig. 13

Comparison between NLKH + SSC and MLIH + SSC model predictions with Tian et al. experimental stabilized completely reversed LCF hysteresis data conducted at (a) 355 °C, (b) 455 °C, and (c) 555 °C

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Fig. 14

NLKH + SSC and MLIH + SSC model predictions with NRIM experimental maximum, minimum, and relaxed stress values for creep-fatigue with 0.1 hr dwells for Δε = 1% at (a) 500 °C and (b) 600 °C and for Δε = 2% at (c) 500 °C and (d) 600 °C

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Fig. 15

Comparison of predicted (a) in-phase and (b) out-of-phase TMF hysteresis loops with superimposed simulated NLKH+SSC and MLIH + SSC and data

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Fig. 16

Simulated results for isothermal creep-fatigue loading at 500 °C with a zero-to-compression strain ratio for (a) Δε = 0.1%, (b) Δε = 0.25%, and (c) Δε = 0.5%

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Fig. 17

Simulated results for TMF conditions with a compressive dwell loaded in zero-to-compression. Simulations carried out for NLKH + SSC and MLIH + SSC models utilizing the (a) monotonic parameters with Δε = 0.25%, (b) monotonic parameters with Δε = 0.5%, (c) midlife parameters with Δε = 0.25%, and (d) midlife parameters with Δε = 0.5%

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