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Research Papers

Pertinence of the Grain Size on the Mechanical Strength of Polycrystalline Metals

[+] Author and Article Information
N. A. Zontsika

Laboratoire des Sciences des Procédés et
des Matériaux (LSPM–UPR CNRS 3407),
Université Paris 13,
99 Avenue Jean-Baptiste Clément,
Villetaneuse 93430, France

A. Abdul-Latif

Laboratoire Quartz,
Supméca, 3,
rue Fernand Hainaut,
St Ouen Cedex 93407, France;
IUT de Tremblay,
Université Paris 8,
Tremblay-en-France 93290, France
e-mail: aabdul@iu2t.univ-paris8.fr

S. Ramtani

Laboratoire des Sciences des Procédés et des
Matériaux (LSPM–UPR CNRS 3407),
Université Paris 13,
99 Avenue Jean-Baptiste Clément,
Villetaneuse 93430, France

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Materials Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received June 10, 2016; final manuscript received September 9, 2016; published online February 9, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Taehyo Park.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 139(2), 021017 (Feb 09, 2017) (10 pages) Paper No: MATS-16-1176; doi: 10.1115/1.4035489 History: Received June 10, 2016; Revised September 09, 2016

Motivated by the already developed micromechanical approach (Abdul-Latif et al., 2002, “Elasto-Inelastic Self-Consistent Model for Polycrystals,” ASME J. Appl. Mech., 69(3), pp. 309–316.), a new extension is proposed for describing the mechanical strength of ultrafine-grained (ufg) materials whose grain sizes, d, lie in the approximate range of 100 nm < d < 1000 nm as well as for the nanocrystalline (nc) materials characterized by d100nm. In fact, the dislocation kinematics approach is considered for characterizing these materials where grain boundary is taken into account by a thermal diffusion concept. The used model deals with a soft nonincremental inclusion/matrix interaction law. The overall kinematic hardening effect is described naturally by the interaction law. Within the framework of small deformations hypothesis, the elastic part, assumed to be uniform and isotropic, is evaluated at the granular level. The heterogeneous inelastic part of deformation is locally determined. In addition, the intragranular isotropic hardening is modeled based on the interaction between the activated slip systems within the same grain. Affected by the grain size, the mechanical behavior of the ufg as well as the nc materials is fairly well described. This development is validated through several uniaxial stress–strain experimental results of copper and nickel.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Inverse-pole figure for the used 400 grains aggregate showing the initial grains distribution

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Fig. 2

Programming flowchart of the model

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Fig. 3

Influence of the diffusion coefficient (Dgb) on the copper flow stress for 500 μm≥d≥3 nm

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Fig. 4

Influence of the model parameter (α) on the copper flow stress for 500 μm≥d≥3 nm

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Fig. 5

Comparison between the overall predicted response and the experiment result for the copper showing the grain size impact on the tensile stress–strain behavior

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Fig. 6

Comparison between the experimental results and the model predictions of the compressive stress–strain for nickel

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Fig. 7

Axial granular responses at the end of loading: (a) elastic, (b) inelastic, and (c) stress showing the impact of the grain size on their evolutions

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Fig. 8

Predicted evolution of the: (a) slip, (b) intragranular isotropic hardening, and (c) resolved shear stress, for a given activated slip system using the three different grain sizes

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Fig. 9

Dependence of the yield stress on the copper grain size

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