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Research Papers

On the Modeling of Fibers Embedding in Aluminum Using Ultrasonic Consolidation

[+] Author and Article Information
Abba A. Abubakar

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
King Fahd University of
Petroleum and Minerals,
Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabia
e-mail: abbamec@yahoo.com

Shafique M. A. Khan

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
King Fahd University of
Petroleum and Minerals,
Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabia
e-mail: skhan@kfupm.edu.sa

Samir Mekid

Mem. ASME
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
King Fahd University of
Petroleum and Minerals,
Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabia
e-mail: smekid@kfupm.edu.sa

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Materials Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received June 23, 2016; final manuscript received October 26, 2016; published online March 23, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Huiling Duan.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 139(3), 031003 (Mar 23, 2017) (9 pages) Paper No: MATS-16-1186; doi: 10.1115/1.4035620 History: Received June 23, 2016; Revised October 26, 2016

Ultrasonic consolidation of fiber optics in metals is of major importance allowing surface embedding and protecting the fibers from exposure to open environment. The paper investigates the computational modeling of this process of embedding fibers at the aluminum subsurface. This new method provides an opportunity to develop sensory materials (Mekid et al., 2015, “Towards Sensor Array Materials: Can Failure be Delayed?” Sci. Technol. Adv. Mater., 16(3), p. 034607) and new types of nervous materials (Mekid and Kwon, 2009, “Nervous Materials: A New Approach for Better Control, Reliability and Safety of Structures,” Sci. Adv. Mater., 1(3), pp. 276–285) for structural health monitoring applications. A thermo-mechanical analysis of embedding SiC fiber in aluminum substrate has been conducted. The temperature distribution was obtained using a thermal model with process-dependent heat flux at the sonotrode/foil interface, which is coupled to the structural model in an iterative manner for simulating fiber embedment. The structural model uses a process-dependent plastic flow rule with an isotropic hardening model. A ductile damage model is employed for the first time in simulating such problems in addition to the use of real material properties of the fiber, which has resulted in better numerical results. Both of these factors help in determining the extent of damage particularly to the fiber/sensor being embedded. The experimental test has shown good agreement.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 2

Meshed problem configuration

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Fig. 3

Equivalent plastic strain distribution at the substrate surface at foil/fiber/substrate interface with a load of 135 MPa

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Fig. 4

Ductile damage parameter at 20 kHz frequency, 8.4 μm amplitude, and 100 MPa load on sonotrode

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Fig. 5

Temperature (°C) distribution at 20 kHz frequency, 8.4 μm amplitude, and 25 MPa load on sonotrode

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Fig. 6

Temperature (°C) distribution at 20 kHz frequency, 8.4μm amplitude, and 50 MPa load on sonotrode

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Fig. 7

Temperature (°C) distribution at 20 kHz frequency, 8.4 μm amplitude, and 100 MPa load on sonotrode

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Fig. 8

Variation of temperature at the weld interface with load at 20 kHz

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Fig. 9

Variation of temperature at the weld interface with frequency at 8.4 μm amplitude

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Fig. 10

Variation of temperature at the weld interface with displacement amplitude at 20 kHz

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Fig. 11

Variation of temperature at the weld interface with initial specimen temperature

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Fig. 16

Ultrasonic consolidation of a fiber inside aluminum

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Fig. 15

Equivalent plastic strain distribution on the foil surface at the foil/fiber/substrate interface with a load of 135 MPa

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Fig. 14

Equivalent plastic strain distribution at 20 kHz frequency, 8.4 μm amplitude, and 100 MPa load on sonotrode

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Fig. 13

von Mises stress distribution (Pa) at 20 kHz frequency, 8.4 μm amplitude, and 100 MPa load on sonotrode

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Fig. 12

von Mises stress distribution (Pa) at 20 kHz frequency, 8.4 μm amplitude, and 25 MPa load on sonotrode

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Fig. 1

Problem configuration with model boundary conditions

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Fig. 17

Boundary conditions

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