0
Research Papers

Response of Cylindrical Composite Structures Subjected to Underwater Impulsive Loading: Experimentations and Computations

[+] Author and Article Information
Tao Qu, Siddharth Avachat

The George W. Woodruff School of
Mechanical Engineering,
Georgia Institute of Technology,
Atlanta, GA 30332

Min Zhou

Fellow ASME
The George W. Woodruff School of
Mechanical Engineering,
Georgia Institute of Technology,
Atlanta, GA 30332
e-mail: min.zhou@gatech.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Materials Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received June 15, 2016; final manuscript received January 10, 2017; published online February 9, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Xi Chen.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 139(2), 021020 (Feb 09, 2017) (11 pages) Paper No: MATS-16-1183; doi: 10.1115/1.4035767 History: Received June 15, 2016; Revised January 10, 2017

The dynamic response of both thick-walled and thin-walled cylindrical composite structures subjected to underwater impulsive loads is analyzed. In the case of thick-walled structures, a novel experimental setup, the underwater shock loading simulator (USLS), is used to generate the impulsive loads. Deflection and core compression are characterized using high-speed digital imaging. The experiments are supported by fully dynamic numerical calculations which account for fluid–structure interactions (FSIs) and damage and failure mechanisms in the materials. The analysis focuses on the effect of varying structural attributes and material properties on load-carrying capacity, deformation mechanisms, and damage. Results show that cylindrical sandwich structures have superior blast-resistance than cylindrical monolithic structures of equal mass with only relatively minor increases in wall thickness. In the case of thin-walled structures, a unique computational framework based on a coupled Eulerian–Lagrangian (CEL) approach is developed to study the structural collapse and damage evolution under large impulsive loads which induces an implosion event. Simulations are carried out for a range of hydrostatic pressure and impulsive load intensity, with different loading configurations. Ply level stress analysis provides an insight on the stress–structural deformation–damage evolution relationship during the severe explosion-induced implosion event. The experiments, computations, and structure–performance relations developed in the current study offer approaches for improving the blast-mitigation capabilities of cylindrical composite sections in critical parts of marine structures, such as the keel, hull, and pipes.

Copyright © 2017 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

(a) Sectional view of underwater shock loading simulator showing the setup for high-speed digital imaging and digital image correlation of impulsively loaded cylindrical sandwich structures and (b) measured experimental pressure histories in the water chamber for four different projectile velocities

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Components of thick-walled, small L/D cylindrical fiberglass structure with [45 deg/−45 deg] layup

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Configuration and layup of thin-walled, large L/D composite cylinder

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Bilinear traction–separation law for cohesive elements

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

(a) Schematic illustration showing the CEL framework for studying the implosion event, (b) output pressure profile at different downstream locations within the Eulerian domain, and (c) Eulerian mesh sensitivity studies showing the output pressure profile at L = 115 mm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

High-speed photographs of a monolithic composite structure subjected to an impulsive load generated by a projectile velocity of V0 = 50 m/s

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Stress wave propagation in a cylindrical monolithic composite structure at different times with magnified images showing damage initiation and evolution

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Stress wave propagation in a cylindrical sandwich composite structure at different times with magnified images showing damage initiation and evolution

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Total energy dissipation in (a) monolithic and (b) sandwich structures subjected to similar impulsive loads

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

(a) Initial shock for cases 1 and 2 loading conditions and (b) damage dissipation energy for the two loading cases

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Contact pressure profiles measured at different locations about the midspan of the cylinder for (a) case 1 loading condition and (b) case 2 loading condition

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Collapse mode shape evolution at different axial locations of the cylinder for (a) case 1 loading condition and (b) case 2 loading condition

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Histories of stress at each ply in the laminated composite associated with structural deformation: (a) axial stress and (b) hoop stress

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Progressive damage evolution with different modes for the typical inner and outer plies in the laminated composite

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

(a) Initial shock for cases 3 and 4, (b) contact pressure profiles measured at location A about the midspan of the cylinder for cases 3 and 4, (c) deflections measured at point A about the midspan of the cylinder for cases 3 and 4, and (d) damage dissipation energy for cases 3 and 4

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 16

(a) Initial shock for cases 5 and 6, (b) contact pressure profile measured at location A about the midspan of the cylinder for cases 5 and 6, (c) deflection measured at point A about the midspan of the cylinder for cases 5 and 6, and (d) damage dissipation energy for cases 5 and 6

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In