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Research Papers

High Strain Rate and High Temperature Behavior of Ti–6Al–4V Alloy Under Compressive Loading

[+] Author and Article Information
Nitin B. Bhalerao

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology Bombay,
Powai 400 076, Mumbai, India

Suhas S. Joshi

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology Bombay,
Powai 400 076, Mumbai, India
e-mail: ssjoshi@iitb.ac.in

N. K. Naik

Department of Aerospace Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology Bombay,
Powai 400 076, Mumbai, India

1Corresponding authors.

Contributed by the Materials Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received May 11, 2017; final manuscript received October 11, 2017; published online January 19, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Hareesh Tippur.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 140(2), 021009 (Jan 19, 2018) (10 pages) Paper No: MATS-17-1135; doi: 10.1115/1.4038671 History: Received May 11, 2017; Revised October 11, 2017

The titanium alloy (grade 5) is a two-phase material, which finds significant applications in aerospace, medical, marine fields, owing to its superior characteristics like high strength-to-weight ratio, excellent corrosion resistance, and good formability. Hence, the dynamic characteristics of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy are an important area to study. A compressive split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) was used to evaluate the dynamic properties of Ti-6Al-4V alloy under various strain rates between 997 and 1898s−1, and at temperatures between −10 °C and 320 °C. It was evident that the material strength is sensitive to both strain rate and temperature; however, the latter is more predominant than the former. The microstructure of the deformed samples was examined using electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD). The microscopic observations show that the dynamic impact characteristics of the alloy are higher at higher strain rates than at quasi-static strain rates. The SHPB tests show that the force on the transmitter bar is lower than the force on the incident bar. This indicates that the dynamic equilibrium cannot be achieved during high rate of damage evolution. Various constants in Johnson–Cook (JC) model were evaluated to validate the results. An uncertainty analysis for the experimental results has also been presented.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

SHPB device for testing in compression mode: (a) schematic arrangement and (b) photograph

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Fig. 2

Compressive SHPB test results for Ti-6Al-4V alloy tested at the strain rate of 1858 s−1 (a) oscilloscope-based strain gauge signals and (b) comparison of force versus time behavior, derived from strain gauge signals

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Fig. 3

High strain rate compressive test results for Ti-6Al-4V alloy at tested at the strain rate of 1858 s−1: (a) strain rate time versus time plot, (b) strain versus time plot, and (c) stress versus time plot

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Fig. 4

Stress–strain plot for Ti-6Al-4V alloy at 1858 s−1 strain rate and at the room temperature

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Fig. 5

Variation of tangent modulus with respect to strain for Ti-6Al-4V alloy tested at strain rate of 1898 s−1 and at room temperature

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Fig. 6

The upper and lower bounds of Young's modulus for Ti-6Al-4V alloy when tested at 1858 s−1 and at room temperature

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Fig. 7

The stress–strain plot of Ti-6Al-4V alloy at different strain rates and at room temperature

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Fig. 8

Compressive yield strength verses strain rate plot for Ti-6Al-4V alloy tested at room temperature

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Fig. 9

The stress–strain plot of Ti-6Al-4V alloy at different temperatures for constant strain rate of 1450 s−1

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Fig. 10

Compressive yield strength verses temperature plot for Ti-6Al-4V alloy for constant strain rate of 1450 s−1

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Fig. 11

Comparison of stress strain curves of Ti-6Al-4V alloy for the experimental data and the Johnson Cook constitutive equation. Remarks: RT test.

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Fig. 12

SEM photomicrograph of Ti-6Al-4V alloy tested at: (a) untested, (b) 1450 s−1, and (c) 1850 s−1 at room temperature

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Fig. 13

The average grain diameter of Ti-6Al-4V alloy of untested sample and sample tested at 1450 s−1 and 1850 s−1, at room temperature

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Fig. 14

SEM photomicrograph of Ti-6Al-4V alloy tested at constant strain rate of 1450 s−1 and at temperature of (a) room temperature, (b) 100 °C, and (c) 320 °C

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Fig. 15

The average grain diameter of Ti-6Al-4V alloy tested at constant strain rate of 1450 s−1 and at temperature of 25 °C, 100 °C, and 320 °C

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