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Technical Brief

Analyses of Constitutive Behavior of As-Cast Aluminum Alloys AA3104, AA5182, and AA6111 During Direct Chill Casting Using Physically Based Models

[+] Author and Article Information
Aman Soni

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Malaviya National Institute of Technology,
Jaipur 302017, Rajasthan, India;
C-133, Sharda Dream City, Chittoor Road,
Bhilwara 311001, Rajasthan, India
e-mail: amanhbd7@gmail.com

Alankar Alankar

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology Bombay,
Powai, Mumbai 400076, Maharashtra, India
e-mail: alankar.alankar@iitb.ac.in

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Materials Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Engineering Materials and Technology. Manuscript received November 26, 2018; final manuscript received February 11, 2019; published online March 13, 2019. Assoc. Editor: Francis Aviles.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 141(3), 034502 (Mar 13, 2019) (9 pages) Paper No: MATS-18-1310; doi: 10.1115/1.4042869 History: Received November 26, 2018; Accepted February 12, 2019

To understand the formation of direct chill (DC)-casting defects, e.g., butt curl and crack formation, it is essential to take into account the effect of temperature variation, strain rate, and their role in the constitutive behavior of the DC-cast alloys. For the correct prediction of defects due to thermal stresses during DC casting, one needs to rely on the fundamentals of mechanisms that may be relevant to the temperatures at below solidus temperatures. This research work aims to find a suitable physically based model for the as-cast aluminum alloys, namely AA3104, AA5182, and AA6111, which can describe the constitutive behavior at below solidus temperatures during complex loading conditions of temperatures and strain rates. In the present work, an earlier measured and modeled (Alankar and Wells, 2010, “Constitutive Behavior of As-Cast Aluminum Alloys AA3104, AA5182 and AA6111 at Below Solidus Temperatures,” Mater. Sci. Eng. A, 527, pp. 7812–7820) stress–strain data are analyzed using the Voce equation and Kocks–Mecking (KM) model. KM model is capable of predicting the hardening and recovery behavior during complex conditions of strain, strain rate, and temperatures during DC casting. Recovery is dependent on temperature and strain rate, and thus, relevant parameters are determined based on the temperature-sensitive annihilation rate of dislocations. For the KM model, we have estimated k1 parameter as a function of temperature, and k2 has been further modeled based on the temperature and strain rate. KM model is able to fit the constant temperature uniaxial tests within 1.5% of the regenerated data.

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Variation of strain rate with decreasing temperature during the type 2 tests (uniaxial compression with cooling) of the respective alloys: (a) AA3104, (b) AA5182, and (c) AA6111 [4] (Chaudhary [43])

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Variation of parameter k2 as a function of temperature at a constant strain rate of 0.01 s−1 for the three alloys

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Variation of uniaxial compressive stress versus strain as a function of temperature (type 1 tests) as regenerated by the extended Ludwik equation for the respective alloys: (a) AA3104, (b) AA5182, and (c) AA6111

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Comparison of uniaxial compressive stress obtained using the Voce equation against the one reproduced by the extended Ludwik equation at various temperatures for the three respective alloys: (a) AA3104, (b) AA5182, and (c) AA6111

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Comparison of uniaxial compressive stress obtained from the KM model against the one reproduced by the extended Ludwik equation at various temperatures for the three alloys: (a) AA3104, (b) AA5182, and (c) AA6111

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Comparison of flow stress obtained using the extended Ludwik equation, the Voce equation, and the KM model for measured flow stress during type 2 tests (compression with cooling) for the respective alloys: (a) AA3104, (b) AA5182, and (c) AA6111

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Variation of temperature during the type 2 experiments (compression with cooling) (Ref. [5])

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