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RESEARCH PAPERS

J. Eng. Mater. Technol. 1973;95(3):133-141. doi:10.1115/1.3443140.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Eng. Mater. Technol. 1973;95(3):142-149. doi:10.1115/1.3443141.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Eng. Mater. Technol. 1973;95(3):150-156. doi:10.1115/1.3443142.

Fatigue crack propagation studies were conducted on a variety of intermediate-strength aluminum alloys under high stress-intensity range cycling (ΔK > 10 ksiin.). Tests were conducted in ambient room air and in 3.5-percent NaCl saltwater environments. Data are presented on log-log coordinates in terms of fatigue crack growth rate (da/dN) as a function of the stress-intensity factor range (ΔK). Comparisons are made among similar crack propagation data for steel and titanium alloys.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Eng. Mater. Technol. 1973;95(3):157-160. doi:10.1115/1.3443143.

To investigate the low cycle fatigue properties of an 18 percent nickel maraging steel, a high pressure fatigue testing machine including the high pressure chamber and associated hydraulic controls was designed and developed to apply simultaneously to the specimen (1) constant fluid pressure up to 100,000 psi, (2) mean uniaxial tensile or compressive stress, and (3) alternating push-pull load at a selected rate. Using this machine, notched and unnotched specimens were tested. Results indicated a definite increase in fatigue life of the material in the high pressure environment.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Eng. Mater. Technol. 1973;95(3):161-169. doi:10.1115/1.3443144.

The major difficulty in applying high strain fatigue data to technological problems lies not in the fatigue aspect per se but in the prediction of the cyclic strain amplitudes. In this paper they are postulated for the cyclic bending of beams using large deflection theory and taking into account the changing stress-strain relationships which occur as cycling progresses. These theories have been tested using beams of rectangular cross section made of three different materials: mild steel, stainless steel, and an aluminum alloy. Good correlation has verified their applicability.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Eng. Mater. Technol. 1973;95(3):170-173. doi:10.1115/1.3443145.

An investigation was made of the effect of cleaning the contacting surfaces of copper samples upon the strength of the diffusion bond formed. The cleaning of surfaces by filing and the diffusion bonding were carried out in high vacuum. Results showed that the bond formed between samples cleaned by filing was greater than the bond formed by samples that were not cleaned prior to bonding. An analysis is made of the data to show that the activation energy of the bonding process is much less than the activation energy of bulk self diffusion of copper.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Eng. Mater. Technol. 1973;95(3):174-181. doi:10.1115/1.3443146.

A theoretical analysis of a bonded single lap joint is presented. The adherends are considered anisotropic whereas the cement is treated as an isotropic material. The analysis is confined to the elastic range. Numerical results are given.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Eng. Mater. Technol. 1973;95(3):182-185. doi:10.1115/1.3443147.

The high strain rate tensile properties of solution annealed Type 304 stainless steel have been determined experimentally. Tests were performed at strain rates ranging from 3 × 10−5 to 1 × 102 in./in./sec at temperatures from 600 to 1600 deg F. At temperatures to 1000 deg F, the strength and ductility are largely insensitive to variations in strain rate, whereas at temperatures from 1200 to 1600 deg F, significant increases in both strength and ductility are observed with increasing strain rate.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Eng. Mater. Technol. 1973;95(3):186-191. doi:10.1115/1.3443148.

A finite element analysis of the diametral test is presented and the results are compared with an elastic analysis and with diametral tests of molded pyrrone disks. Both the elastic and the finite element analysis gave similar stresses for points near the center of the disk. Near the points of loading, however, the elastic analysis gave infinitely high stresses whereas the finite element analysis gave high but finite stresses. A simulated fracture was made using the finite element analysis. The fracture began at the center of the disk and propagated toward the loading points. As the fracture approached the loading points, the finite element analysis indicated the formation of four secondary fracture sites in the disk. These sites were a normal development for a soft loading system. The existence and location of the secondary fracture sites was confirmed by diametral tests of molded pyrrone disks.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Eng. Mater. Technol. 1973;95(3):192-194. doi:10.1115/1.3443149.

The beam on elastic foundation is employed as a mathematical model to develop an explanation for the crawling phenomena observed for the rails used to support the rotating beds of large rotary kilns.

Topics: Rails , Rotary kilns
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

DISCUSSIONS

J. Eng. Mater. Technol. 1973;95(3):195-196. doi:10.1115/1.3443150.
FREE TO VIEW
Abstract
Topics: Flywheels
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

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